Rados-Designed Research And Monitoring Vessel Being Built By Knight & Carver In San Diego

Rados International Corporation, naval architects and marine engineers of San Pedro, Calif., has been awarded a design contract for furnishing the complete design, engineering, and construction inspection of a new 84-foot twin-screw, full secondary research and monitoring vessel for the City of Los Angeles.

The vessel, named Lamer (Los Angeles Marine Environmental Research), will be responsible for collecting water quality samples, and various other biological samplings, etc., primarily in the Santa Monica Bay.

Principal characteristics include an overall length of 84 feet, a beam of 22 feet, a 5-foot draft, and a displacement of 56 long tons. The propulsion calls for two diesel engines with 764 bhp each and two auxiliary generators with 40- kw capacity each.

The vessel, a twin-screw, semi-planing hull of fiberglass reinforced construction, will have a total crew and scientific complement of eight persons. It will be equipped with onboard laboratories, active and passive stabilization systems and deck equipment which will include "A" frames, oceanographic winches, and sea cranes. The latest in specialized scientific equipment, electronic and navigation equipment will also be provided. The vessel will be designed and built in accordance with the rules and regulations of the American Bureau of Shipping.

Knight & Carver, yacht and shipbuilders of San Diego, Calif., were awarded the construction contract for the 84-foot vessel. Specialists in the use of multi-laminates and Airex closed-cell foam core, Knight & Carver anticipates a delivery date in late 1989.

For more information and free literature on Rados International Corporation For free literature describing the facilities and capabilities of the yacht and shipbuilding firm of Knight & Carver

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